Cooking Terminology

My Little ROCK – Reliable Organised Cooking Kitchen

Cooking Terminology

Cooking Terminology

The following information is phrases and references I have found when reviewing recipes.

Al Dente

  • Tender but firm to bite.
  • Usually has reference to pasta.

Au Gratin

  • Food cooked in a shallow oven proof dish covered in breadcrumbs, sauce or cheese that gets finished off in the oven or grilled to crisp up the coating.

Bain-Marie

  • Hot water bath used to diffuse direct heat.
  • Keeps liquids and foods at a simmering point.
  • A bowl that is placed in or on another pan of simmering water.

Baste

  • Moistening food while its cooking by spooning or brushing on liquid.

Batons / Batonnets

  • Vegies cut into small sticks that are approximately 5mm thick and 6cm long.

Batten

  • To flatten out your protein with a mallet.

Beat

  • Stirring vigorously……

Blanched

  • A process where something is boiled for a few minutes and then refreshed in cold water.
  • Fruits and nuts can be blanched to remove their skins easier.

Blend

  • To mix thoroughly.

Blind Bake

  • To bake an unfilled pastry case.
  • Usually done by lining the exposed pastry with grease proof paper, filling it with pastry weights (rice or beans can be used too) and then cooking it in the oven.

Bouquet Garni

  • A combination of fresh or dried herbs and spices either tied together or combined in a cloth bag. Its used to flavour dishes while cooking and then removed prior to serving.

Braised

  • Food that is slowly cooked in a covered pan.
  • Prior to braising the food has usually been browned in come hot oil.

Brew

  • When you place your ingredients in a hot liquid so that the flavour is extracted.

Brown

  • To cook in a small amount of fat until its surface is browned.

Butterfly

  • To split something like a prawn almost all the way through the centre. The two halves are then open flat to resemble a butterfly.

Chill

  • To chill in the fridge but not freeze.

Chop

  • To cut into pieces with a sharp knife.

Coddle

  • To cook something slowly just below simmering point.

Deglaze

  • To blend concentrated liquid and deposits from the bottom of a pan using liquid.

De-vein

  • Removing the dark gritty poop tube from the back of a prawn.
  • Use a knife to cut down the back of the prawn and then discard the poop tube.

Dry Roasted

  • Dry roasting is done with nuts and spices in a dry frying pan over heat.

Emulsify

  • To mix one liquid with another that normally doesn’t combine smoothly e.g.: oil and vinegar.

Escalope

  • Pieces of boneless meat that have been thinned out using a mallet.

Fold

  • Gently incorporating one mixture into another……that’s the best I can come up with at the moment.

Fry – Deep Frying

  • Deep frying is a cooking method that immerses food in large quantities of hot fat or oil.
  • When deep frying your pan should be deep and wide.
  • The food must float freely in the oil / fat when you deep fry.

Julienne

  • Cutting something into very thin matchstick strips.

Macerate

  • The process of adding fruit into sugar and alcohol to soften it and give it more flavour.

Pin-Boning

  • Removing the bones from a fish with tweezers or pliers.

Refresh

  • Plunging something into iced water until completely cold.

Shaved

  • Something sliced extremely finely with a peeler or mandolin.

Simmer

  • Maintaining a gentle bubbling action after boiling by lowering the heat.

Skim

  • To lift or discard unwanted particles on the surface of something.

Sweat

  • Cooking something on a low heat until tender without browning.

Zest

  • The outer part of a citrus fruit removed with a knife, peeler or zester.

 

Do you have any other cooking terminology terms not listed on this page? I’d love to hear from you! Leave a comment below and I’ll add it to my list.

ROCK

3 replies

  1. You have so much information! I’m impressed. Love what you are doing, keep it up!

    Liked by 1 person

Trackbacks

  1. Cooking Terminology | Everyday Family Favorites

Leave a Comment

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: